Now Reading
“No Overthinking” Review: Savara’s New Album is a Well-Crafted Collection

“No Overthinking” Review: Savara’s New Album is a Well-Crafted Collection

“No Overthinking” Review: Savara’s New Album is a Well-Crafted Collection

No Overthinking is a well-crafted collection of songs whose distinctive and entertaining soundscapes and lyrics advocate for celebrating the varied splendours of this world… 

By Frank Njugi

Kenyan Afropop’s most renowned musical group, Sauti Sol, is a quartet made up of outrageously talented yet disparate individuals. Sauti Sol is an amalgamation of sublime vocals by Bien, the smooth acoustic accompaniments of dexterous guitarist, Fancy Fingers, the baritone gruff vocals of Chimano, and the charismatic performances of polished entertainer, Delvin Savara Mudigi, who is popularly known as Savara.

Savara is also known for his solo projects, such as the 2022 LP Savage Level, and successful singles such as 2021’s “Balance” and  2023’s “Reggae Ya Kinyozi”. Inundated in his artistry are complex vocal harmonies that attest to his relevance as a solo artiste whenever he steps away from the Sauti Sol banner. His new album, No Overthinking, released on the 10th of May, 2024, is a project overrun by romance songs. This album further showcases his bravura as an invigorating performer, and cements his image as a musician exceptional enough to thrive as a solo act, having been part of an internationally successful boy band for over 18 years.

No Overthinking is an eight-track project, and Savara kicks off the album with “Bossa Vibe”. “Bossa Vibe” is a tuneful song, with lyricism that explores having a good time through many of life’s encumbering challenges. It has a joyous jazzy groove, where Savara’s flow intertwines with fractures of the melody with profound precision. The second track, “Roxanna”, is euphoria-inducing, reminiscent of old Sauti Sol tracks such as  2020’s “Suzanna”. The song sees Savara successfully borrow from the Afrobeats soundscapes, and uses Afrobeats lyrical delivery as he on occasion mimics a Nigerian Pidgin accent and employs lexicon staples in the genre, resulting in a fine song with complex intersecting rhythms.

No Overthinking Review:  Savara’s New Album is a Well-Crafted Collection | Afrocritik
Savara

“Wewe ni Fire”, the song that comes next, features the South African Amapiano duo of Mathye and Khathutshelo, popularly known as Murumba Pitch, in the first of three collaborations in this album. The song might as well be a pantomime, as Savara’s chorus lyrics are inundated with slapsticks and sensual innuendoes that make for an entertaining listen, delivered over whimsical beats to give an overly percussed rhythm. 

The second collaboration, “Life on the Road”, is with Tanzanian Bongo Flava recording artiste, Harmonize, in what is perhaps the best song on No Overthinking. This track has a nimble rhythm and the vocals of both artistes sail into one’s earshot as a display of ingenuity. The two dive into the strains and upheaval of being far away from a partner, with their lyrics adeptly equating this to a form of cataclysm.

“No Overthinking” Review:  Savara’s New Album is a Well-Crafted Collection | Afrocritik
No Overthinking tracklist

The third collaboration is with London and Accra-based producer, composer, writer, and musician, MYX Quest, and Ghanaian Highlife artiste, Mr Drew, in the song “Euphoria”. This is the fifth track in the album, and with its upbeat tempo, Savara, with the featured acts, sings about self-gratification through high living — they take romance with a solid partner as one prime example of doing this. The word,  ‘Euphoria’ is reiterated throughout the song, describing the kind of emotion elicited from the sort of epicureanism advocated for.  “Smile”, the follow-up to “Euphoria”,  has some echo samples and synths that are strategically employed, such as where Savara sings the chorus in Swahili, resulting in an enlivened romantic ballad — with which he praises the smile of an unnamed lover.

The penultimate track on No Overthinking, “Tequila”, exhibits Congolese music aesthetics as the beat displays a bright, intricate guitar improvisation similar to that of Soukous dance music and a faster dance rhythm like that of Rhumba. The song emphasises the need to have a good time by mollycoddling yourself and those around you, and its lyrical theme is heavily complimented by the higher tempo maintained throughout. The last track, “3 Step”, fuses a complex jazzy rhythm with some log drums in the background, becoming a dance rendering. The title might as well refer to a dance style as Savara sings about doing a ‘3 Step’ Ndombolo and ‘backing it up’ — a phrase known to refer to pirouetting while dancing.

savarafrica 20240513 0002 jpg
Savara

No Overthinking is a well-crafted collection of songs whose distinctive and entertaining soundscapes and lyrics advocate for celebrating the varied splendours of this world — making one luxuriate at the listening moment. The album could easily be grouped among the best East African musical projects released this year.  Savara is a virtuoso entertainer, a vocalist with an infinite range, having all the makings of a musical superstar, and this solo album further solidifies this assumption. 

Lyricism — 1.3

Tracklisting — 1.5

See Also
Jiggy Forever - Young Jonn - Review - Afrocritik

Sound Engineering — 1.8

Vocalisation — 1.8

Listening Experience — 1.7

Rating — 8.1 / 10

Frank Njugi is a Kenyan Writer, Culture journalist and Critic who has written on the Kenyan and East African culture scene for platforms such as Debunk Media, The Republic, Culture Africa, Sinema Focus, Wakilisha Africa, The Moveee, Africa in Dialogue, Afrocritik and many others. He tweets as @franknjugi.

What's Your Reaction?
Excited
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
Silly
0

© 2024 Afrocritik.com. All Rights Reserved.

Scroll To Top